Blogging

Blogging Break

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John Calvin, On Why We Believe Christ Alone

Image result for john calvin“We see that our whole salvation and all its parts are comprehended in Christ [Acts 4:12]. We should therefore take care not to derive the least portion of it from anywhere else. If we see salvation, we are taught by the very name of Jesus that it is “of him” [1 Cor 1:30)]. If we seek any other gifts of the Spirit, they will be found in his anointing. If we seek strength, it lies in his dominion; if purity, in his conception; if gentleness, it appears in his birth…If we seek redemption, it lies in his passion; if acquittal, in his condemnation; if remission of the curse, in his cross [Gal. 3:13]; if satisfaction, in his sacrifice; if purification, in his blood; if reconciliation, in his descent in to hell; if mortification of the flesh, in his tomb; if newness of life, in his resurrection; if immortality, in the same; if inheritance of the Heavenly Kingdom, in his entrance into heaven; if protection, if security, if abundant supply of all blessings, in his Kingdom; if untroubled expectation of judgement, in the power given to him to judge. In short, since rich store of every kind of good abounds in him, let us drink our fill from this fountain, and from no other.” (John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion)

Happy BD to Our Blog!

5 years old! That is the age of my blog.

Every year on this blog’s BD, I update my original blog post, which was posted on November 3, 2012.

What is the meaning of the blog’s name? Perhaps if you are new to reading this blog, you have scratched your head about the title. And if you are not new and have been reading it for a while, it is always good to remind yourself why we do what we do (e.g., like a church reminding its people of their vision or core values from time to time).

Our blog is called “Worldly Saints.” Those who’ve done some reading in church history may recognize that phrase from a book written by Dr. Leland Ryken of Wheaton College. In it, Ryken deals with various Puritan views on subjects like work, sex, leisure, etc. Others probably see that blog title and think, “That’s an oxymoron. Isn’t worldliness a sin? How can someone who is striving to be holy actually be worldly?”

Clearly some clarification is needed. Both the terms “worldly” and “saints” are often used loosely.

But the basic premise behind our blog is this: As those who have been redeemed by God and who strive to worship Him in every activity of life (I Cor 10:31), we are “saints.” But as citizens of heaven (Phil 3:20) who are still dwellers on earth, we are “worldly” – in the sense that we live here in the world and not yet with Him in heaven. We are worldly saints.

Happy BDWe want each and every thing we do to be an act of worship. We want to drink our coffee (Andrea’s preference) and drink our tea (Charles’ preference) for God’s glory. We want to worship God as we get ourselves ready for the day. We want God to be magnified in those early morning and late night conversations. We want God to be honored when we cheer on our favorite sports teams (e.g., Niners, Seahawks, Giants, Mariners, Sooners, Lakers). We want to – as Brother Lawrence once wrote – practice His presence by always worshipping Him. We want every moment and every sphere of life to matter for His glory.

We don’t always succeed in these endeavors – and we won’t — but it is our goal to strive to worship Him both in the mundane things of life as well as in the serious and sober.

We are worldly saints, and this blog is dedicated to demonstrating that God can be magnified in all things. We will use our God-centered worldview as we write about current news, sports, conversations with our children, Bible studies, sermonettes, mentoring others, our vocation, theological or philosophical debates, post videos, answer submitted questions by our readers, etc. We don’t want a single blog post to be wasted or without purpose.

Enjoy the blog, and whether you eat or drink, do it for God’s glory.

 

Greg Gilbert, Why You Cannot Ignore Jesus

Image result for greg gilbert“When someone claims to be your God, you really have two choices, right? You can reject the claim or you can accept it. What you can’t do, at least for very long, is suspend judgment and just see how it plays out. Jesus claimed some amazing things about himself, and also about you… Whatever you wind up thinking about Jesus, the fact remains that he makes strong, even evasive claims about you and your relationship to God. Sure, you can ignore those claims – you can ignore anything if you try hard enough – but when somebody says, ‘You are a rebel against the God who made you, and his sentence against you is death. But I have come to stand in your place, to take that penalty and save you,’ that’s something you probably should pay attention to” (Greg Gilbert, Who Is Jesus?)

Just In Case You Missed It – October 15-21, 2017

  1. 3 Lessons from the Life of John Bunyan” by Austin T. Duncan (The Master’s Seminary).
  2. Be a Boaz in Your Business” by Rachel Starke (The Gospel Coalition). The way Boaz treated Ruth “in the workplace” is a template for men everywhere when it comes to being above reproach.
  3. Pastors’ Housing Allowance Tax Break Overturned” by Gene Veith (Cranach: The Blog of Veith). Not encouraged with this news.
  4. Two Indispensable Requirements for Pastoral Ministry” by Kevin DeYoung (The Gospel Coalition). Liking your people and liking the Bible you preach to them – you gotta have these or you won’t “do well” in pastoral ministry.
  5. Why You May Be Tempted to Neglect Your Church” by Tim Challies.
  6. Willow Creek Chooses Co-ed Pastors to Succeed Hybels” by Kate Shellnutt (Christianity Today). As if it couldn’t get any worse at Willow Creek!